Review – The Silver Metal Lover by Tanith Lee

The Silver Metal Lover is a love story about finding yourself and the person that compliments, brings out the best in you. Their relationship is beautifully developed within the constraint of a future world beset with environmental issues and discontent, So even though it breaks my heart every time I read it, there is such joy and hope in this sublime sci fi tale that I can’t help but love it.

No-Mod by Derek Porterfield 

No-Mod takes place in a techno-religious city, where the marginalised include those without biomedical modification. Addie’s search for answers takes her on the run revealing more about this autocratic world than she had envisaged. Riveting YA read with little details that make it a pleasure to read. I am looking forward to the sequel.

Review – Corporate Gunslinger: A Novel by Doug Engstrom

Corporate Gunslinger seems so very timely about the power of corporations and overwhelming debt. Insurance companies already use small print to deny claims, thus it’s no stretch to imagine the possibility that they would eventually utilise skilled killers to ensure they don’t have to pay out. In no way does it seem strange that gunfighting is part of the American legal system.

Review – On the Come Up by Angie Thomas

Bri is a typical teenager, rash, impulsive but also thoughtful. I found her annoying in part but realistic at heart. You too will want Bri to win on talent alone and make the right choices, because she deserved it , but this isn’t a fairy tale, the reality is, being talented isn’t enough. On The Come Up is a fantastic read about making choices and fighting against stereotypes.

Review – Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo

Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo eloquently shows that that love, abuse, the whole spectrum of the human condition is the same and gives no quarter for ethnicity or gender. Her understanding of human beings and ability to convey the complexity of human thought, behaviour and action, through a multifaceted, nuanced depiction of race and relationships in an accessible way, is a triumph.

orphans of the tide blog post cover

Review – Orphans of the Tide by Struan Murray

Orphans of the Tide is a fantastic tale about history, loss, friendship, and love. It takes place in a bleak land almost devoid of joy, where the inhabitants are focused only on survival, a place mired in mystery: this is The City. Where strange things happen because they always have and only a few remember or know the truth of the matter.

The world-building is wonderful and the characters charming, thoroughly recommend

Review – The Impossible Boy by Ben Brooks

“Adults always pretend the things they do are terribly complicated and unknowable. For the most part, they’re walking into rooms and pressing buttons of one sort or another.” Best friendsOleg and Emma are clever, they have us sussed. They do something incredible and create an Impossible Boy. Reading about what happens next will be the highlight of your day. The crazy shenanigans that ensue are random and satisfying. The tender, sweet way that family and tough real life issues are discussed and portrayed is marvellous.

Review – Becoming by Michelle Obama

Becoming surprised me with the scope it covered and the detail that it went into. It was a lovely window into the life of a public figure that I initally thought that I didn’t need to know more about. Thankfully I was proved wrong. Michelle Obama writes well with warmth, humour and purpose. The honesty and clarity was refreshing. It’s a great read, expertly read by the author which gave an added depth. Recommended.