Tagged: Kindle

blog post - hench

Review – Hench by Natalie Zina Walschots

Hench, like The Boys, set heroes in a world where they are three dimensional, showing their wants, desires and motivations.
Anna has been at their mercy and didn’t appreciate the experience nor the repercussions. Hench is her journey on fighting backing using modern methods including data mining and social media to take them down.
Hench is engaging, entertaining and a really fun read

reakfast at bronzefield - banner

Review – Breakfast at Bronzefield by Sophie Campbell

A first person of colour account of incarceration in the largest female prison in England. It will make you think beyond the stereotypes and the inflammatory headlines to the real issues facing inmates. Sophie Campbell has given us an insight into all the issues we thought we knew and provided new food for thought. An honest portrayal of her experience inside.

Review – Hyenas by Michael Sellars

This zombie tale delivers an interesting premise on the genre with plenty of danger, thrills and gore. It invites us to question what makes us human. You will be fascinated as I was to know more about the assertion. Scary but thoughtful read.

Review – Gargantis by Thomas Taylor

Gargantis is another cracking read, full to the brim with more sinister happenings in Eerie on Sea. Verdict: Lovely place to visit, too scary to live there, never a moment’s peace. A thrilling middle grade mystery.

Recap – March 2020

Despite all that was happening, I still managed to read some great books in March and one of them naturally took the top spot. My book of the month went to the advance review copy of Corporate Gunslinger: A Novel by Doug Engstrom. It was a compelling read about a world quite similar to this one: inequalities in our society and crushing debt, how very timely

Monthly Preview – March 2020

Given all that is going on (for me personally) in March 2020, reading is taking a backseat this month. I’ve cut back on the usual extravagant list of books to read and will instead try where I can to catch up on the books that were missed in previous months. Fingers crossed.

Recap – February 2020

February was incredibly busy and made me face the realisation that as much as I love reading actual books, I don’t have the capacity to actually read them. I struggled to read six paperbacks, only getting around to two of my eagerly anticipated science fiction re-reads.

The poison of war

Book Brief – The Poison of War by Jennifer Leeper

The Poison of War is as much about the murders, as it is about reservation life and the threat of Mexican cartels. The impact of change, circumstance, and this age of distractions and competing priorities, is starkly shown on the Tohono O’odham Nation way of life.